Fluid Resuscitation and Hypovolemic Shock Course Logo

Fluid Resuscitation and Hypovolemic Shock

Green Clock Hours: 1.00

Hypovolemia occurs for a variety of reasons. Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea can deplete intravascular volumes. Excessive diuresis from diabetes insipidus or diabetic ketoacidosis can also reduce intravascular volumes. When caring for trauma patients, hypovolemic shock is due to blood loss from sustained injuries. A blood loss of 20% of total blood volume is considered hypovolemic shock. Hypovolemia is not always that obvious. Patients with abdominal or chest injuries or fractures may bleed internally. Hypovolemic shock can be life-threatening in most trauma situations. Undetected or undertreated compensatory hypovolemic shock can progress to decompensated shock. The entire trauma team must remain alert for the signs of hypovolemic shock.

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$20.00

Course Description

Hypovolemia occurs for a variety of reasons. Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea can deplete intravascular volumes. Excessive diuresis from diabetes insipidus or diabetic ketoacidosis can also reduce intravascular volumes. When caring for trauma patients, hypovolemic shock is due to blood loss from sustained injuries. A blood loss of 20% of total blood volume is considered hypovolemic shock. Hypovolemia is not always that obvious. Patients with abdominal or chest injuries or fractures may bleed internally. Hypovolemic shock can be life-threatening in most trauma situations. Undetected or undertreated compensatory hypovolemic shock can progress to decompensated shock. The entire trauma team must remain alert for the signs of hypovolemic shock.

Only $249
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Only $249