Introduction to Person-Centered Care in Assisted Living

Introduction to Person-Centered Care in Assisted Living 

This purpose of this course is to familiarize the learner with basic information concerning person-centered care as it relates to implementation in the care setting. The history of long-term care, including important legislation that shaped the industry, will be examined. Factors resulting in growth of long-term care and the emergence of evidence-based and person-centered care models will be considered. Medical and institutional models of care will be compared with person-centered care while the structural elements of the person-centered care culture will be explored. Learners will be able to identify important principles of person-centered care that promote deep and lasting change within organizations where person-centered care is implemented.

$20.00

Hours: 1.00
REL-PAC-0-IPCAL

Certificates

Certificates provided by accrediting body (3 Match)

California Department of Social Services Adult Residential Facilities

1.0 HOURS


Relias, LLC is approved by the California Department of Social Services as a Continuing Education Program Vendor to provide Continuing Education training courses to administrators of Adult Residential Facilities.

Vendor/Provider # : 2000224-735-2
Approval # 224-0145-32611

This activity is approved by the California Department of Social Services for 1.00 contact hours.

California Department of Social Services Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly

1.0 HOURS


Relias, LLC is approved by the California Department of Social Services as a Continuing Education Training Program Vendor to provide Continuing Education training courses to administrators of residential care facilities for the elderly.

Vendor/Provider # 2000224-740-2;
Approval # 224-0145-32670.

This activity is approved by the California Department of Social Services for 1.00 contact hours.

Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (ALL Direct Care Workers)

1.0 HOURS


Relias Learning, LLC is approved as a Curriculum Developer by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. This activity is approved for 1.00 contact hours for all WA State Direct Care Workers. Training Provider Code: WA0624. CE Approval Code: CO1933271

Course Details

Course Code: REL-PAC-0-IPCAL
Hours: 1
Type: Online Course
Content Expiration Date: 8/31/2023
Learning Objectives:
Define person-centered care.
Recognize the history of long-term care, including important legislation and the emergence of new care models that led to the development of a person-centered care approach.
Distinguish between institutional and resident-centered cultures.
Identify nine structural elements of the person-centered care model.
List important characteristics of person-centered care for each of the nine structural elements, including core values, relationships, community, leadership, workforce, services, meaningful life, environment, and accountability.
Identify important principles for lasting culture change within organizations where person-centered care is implemented.

Outline:
I. Introduction to Person-Centered Care (PCC) A. Course overview and objectives B. Introduction 1. Perspectives on person-centered care 2. Definitions 3. Systems perspective C. PCC culture 1. Focus on person receiving care 2. Family involvement D. Checkpoint 1: Multiple-choice question II. History of Person-Centered Care A. Early history of elder care in U.S. 1. How the long-term care industry began a. Intergenerational care, large families, and poor farms 2. Federal legislation supports growth in long-term care a. Social Security and Old Age Assistance (1935) i. Changing demographics (1935-1965) a) Nursing home care begins b. Other bills that supported growth i. Hill-Burton Act (1945 and 1975) ii. Kerr-Mills Act (1965) a) Cost of building facilities b) Reimbursement for care c. First National Healthcare Program i. Medicare expands healthcare beyond Medicaid 3. Checkpoint 2: Multiple-choice question B. Factors in the growth of long-term care industry 1. Nursing home care a. Modeled after hospitals b. Quality of care vs. quality of life 2. Culture change efforts a. Founding of NCCNHR (now known as Consumer Voice) i. Social worker Emma Holder and advocates ii. Guiding force for reform b. Nursing Home Reform Act (OBRA ’87) i. Reform: standards of care, rights for elderly and quality of life c. Assisted living model of care i. Founder Keren Brown Wilson/Oregon (1970-1980s) d. Growing awareness of need for change a. Restraint reduction movement b. Pioneer Network (1997) c. Person-centered care 3. National cuidelines established for assisted living a. Center for Excellence in Assisted Living (CEAL) formed in 2004 C. Why history matters 1. System change, and practices are responsive to influences 2. Small group of people change elder care 3. History serves as example for the future 4. Margaret Mead quote D. Checkpoint 3: Multiple-choice question III. The Person-Centered Culture of Care A. Pioneer Network vision for culture change 1. Institutional-directed culture 2. Resident-directed culture B. Gold standard C. Person-centered care 1. Structure and framework: PCC’s nine structural elements 2. FIRST ELEMENT: Core values and philosophy a. What does patient-centered care value? i. Putting values into practice a) Care organized around the individual 1. Checkpoint 4 a. Case Scenario: Mrs. Capizuto and Lashandra b. Multiple-choice question c. Discussion d. Multiple-choice question b) Person-centered work culture 1. Why it’s important and what to do 2. Benefits of a PCC work culture 3. SECOND ELEMENT: Building Relationships and Community a. Sense of belonging and home b. Consistent assignment of staff i. Relationships and job satisfaction ii. Setting relationship boundaries a) Elder wisdom c. Other things that work: i. spontaneous engagement and sharing staff skills with residents ii. providing opportunities for community service a) Video: A Heart to Serve iii. Intergenerational programs a) Video: Providence Mt. St. Vincent d. Administrator support 4. THIRD ELEMENT: Senior Management Support a. Active involvement and commitment to PCC b. Decision-making and problem-solving/role as hands-on helper 5. FOURTH ELEMENT: Leadership a. Alter top-down/hierarchal approaches i. Scenario 1: Mr. Jones and mealtimes ii. Questions for reflection/discussion iii. Scenario 2: Administrator and staff dialog iv. Discussion v. Checkpoint 5: Multiple-choice question b. Leadership i. Five key practices ii. Transformational leadership 6. FIFTH ELEMENT: Workforce a. Staffing i. Quality staff ii. Characteristics iii. Getting people off the bus b. Work Teams i. Self-directed work teams ii. Team communication and training 7. SIXTH ELEMENT: Services a. Person-centered services b. “I” format service plans i. I-format service plan for Mr. Jones ii. Key points iii. Example iv. Explanation v. Checkpoint 6: Multiple-choice question 8. SEVENTH ELEMENT: Meaningful Life a. Definition b. Five features of meaningful relationships i. Video of David ii. Discussion iii. Checkpoint 7: Multiple-choice question 9. EIGHTH ELEMENT: Environment a. Physical i. Aesthetics ii. Accessibility and adaptation b. Emotional i. Feeling at home vs. feeling homeless 10. NINTH ELEMENT: Accountability a. Accountable to internal and external sources b. Person -centered measurement tools

Instructor: Joanne Rader, MN, RN
Joanne Rader, RN, MN, has worked  as a nurse in the field of long term care for more than 40 years. She graduated from University of Maryland, School of Nursing in 1968, with a BSN and from Oregon Health and Science University in 1979 with a Master's in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.  As a nurse clinical specialist, she worked to reduce the use of physical restraints, inappropriate psychoactive medications, and defensive, self-protective behaviors during bathing for persons with dementia. She was on the faculty of the Oregon Health Science University (OHSU), School of Nursing for 20 years and published numerous articles and books addressing the emotional needs and behavioral symptoms of persons with dementia and co-authored and produced manuals and videos on individualized wheelchair seating for older adults. In 1996, 2002 and 2008, her books, Individualized Dementia Care: Creative, Compassionate Approaches and Bathing Without a Battle,  won  AJN Book of the Year Awards. She is a founding member of the Pioneer Network, an organization working to change the culture of aging in America. Currently, she works as an independent consultant and babysitter for grandchildren. Disclosure: Joanne Rader, MN, RN has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
Instructor: Cynthia McDaniel, MSN, RN
Cynthia McDaniel MSN RN, is a nurse and administrative consultant in long term care. She is the CEO of ElderWise Inc, a senior living consulting and education group. Cynthia has worked as a nurse consultant for the States of Oregon and Washington,  a geriatric care manager, a regional director of clinical operations for a senior living company, and an assistant professor at Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing. Her research in assisted living focused on the characteristics of residents in assisted living communities and the role of the nurse in assisted living. Cynthia holds a Master's of Science in Nursing from Gonzaga University in nursing education. She is a Fellow of the Sigma Theta Tau/John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy.  Disclosure: Cynthia McDaniel, MSN, RN has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
Instructor: Catherine Zimmerman, LICSW, ACHP-SW, CSW-G
Catherine Zimmerman is a licensed independent clinical social worker who has a private practice providing counseling services to people of all ages and all stages of their lives. She is a freelance healthcare writer and speaker specializing in mental health, ethics, hospice and palliative care, gerontological topics, substance misuse, caregiving, stress and trauma.  Zimmerman received her master's degree from Portland State University thirty years ago and is certified in clinical social work-Gerontology. Zimmerman supervises and mentors therapists seeking licensure in Oregon or Washington states. She is the current President of the Washington chapter of the National Association of Social Workers and has provided public presentations on over twenty topics and has numerous published works. Disclosure: Catherine Zimmerman, LICSW, ACHP-SW, CSW-G has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
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Course Delivery Method and Format
Asynchronous/Online Distance Learning; please see certificate details for specifics on delivery format.
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All characteristics and organizations referenced in the following training are fictional. Any resemblance to any actual organizations or persons living or dead, is purely coincidental.
To earn continuing education credit for this course you must achieve a passing score of 80% on the post-test and complete the course evaluation.
Accommodations
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