Payer Perspective: Diabetes Management for Clinicians

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Diabetes is a common condition in today’s healthcare system. This high-volume condition can be managed very effectively, but diabetes disease management can also become very complicated. If a patient has prediabetes and steps are not taken to slow its progression it can easily turn into diabetes. Once diabetic, if not controlled, the disease will lead to serious complications such as neuropathies, renal disease, and cardiac disease leading to decreased quality of life and increased cost. With these new health conditions patients will also need more drug therapies as well as additional prescriber care. As patients’ progress, there is the probability of increased hospitalizations leading to multiple transitions of care. It is important to educate these patients in order to bring costs down and quality of life up. How can patients learn to manage their own diabetes? What strategies are most effective in teaching patient self-care? By creating an action plan with their patients, primary care providers can not only help to improve patient outcomes, but they also empower the patient to take a bigger role in their own disease management. When patients take on more responsibility for their care, resources (both time and economic) are freed up and can be allocated to other patients or areas of need. However, creating an action plan requires input from both the primary care provider and the patient, and no 2 plans are likely to be the same. Factors such as finances, living situation, or other social determinants of health all must be considered when putting together a plan. A patient’s diet may also play a role. In this module, the topics of pharmacotherapy, action plans, the social determinants of health, and nutritional counseling will be explored.

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Course Description

Diabetes is a common condition in today’s healthcare system. This high-volume condition can be managed very effectively, but diabetes disease management can also become very complicated. If a patient has prediabetes and steps are not taken to slow its progression it can easily turn into diabetes. Once diabetic, if not controlled, the disease will lead to serious complications such as neuropathies, renal disease, and cardiac disease leading to decreased quality of life and increased cost. With these new health conditions patients will also need more drug therapies as well as additional prescriber care. As patients’ progress, there is the probability of increased hospitalizations leading to multiple transitions of care. It is important to educate these patients in order to bring costs down and quality of life up. How can patients learn to manage their own diabetes? What strategies are most effective in teaching patient self-care? By creating an action plan with their patients, primary care providers can not only help to improve patient outcomes, but they also empower the patient to take a bigger role in their own disease management. When patients take on more responsibility for their care, resources (both time and economic) are freed up and can be allocated to other patients or areas of need. However, creating an action plan requires input from both the primary care provider and the patient, and no 2 plans are likely to be the same. Factors such as finances, living situation, or other social determinants of health all must be considered when putting together a plan. A patient’s diet may also play a role. In this module, the topics of pharmacotherapy, action plans, the social determinants of health, and nutritional counseling will be explored.

Only $249
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