Systematic Instruction Strategies

Systematic Instruction Strategies 

Many people with developmental disabilities and other challenges have limited opportunities to enjoy the same kinds of life experiences as other people in society. One of the barriers to participating fully in these life experiences is the lack of some of the critical skills and knowledge needed to be successful. Direct support staff play a significant role in helping people live meaningful lives by helping them learn the skills and abilities they will use in everyday life. Direct support staff, therefore, need to demonstrate effective teaching skills in order to play this role in people’s lives. This course provides systematic instruction strategies and techniques to aid you in teaching people the skills and routines they need to be successful in their lives. You will learn how to approach a learning experience, including understanding individual learning styles and planning for the instructional process. You also will acquire teaching methods for special circumstances. These techniques will help you to simplify complex tasks so that people with disabilities and other challenges will have a wider array of life experiences available to them. To assist you in understanding how to use these proven teaching techniques, this course includes interactive exercises and detailed vignettes to help you apply your learning. The course will benefit anyone who has responsibility for teaching individuals to develop skills and abilities in their lives.

$81.25

Hours: 3.25
REL-IDD-GH-SI

Certificates

Certificates provided by accrediting body (1 Match)

National Alliance for Direct Support Professionals

3.25 HOURS


This activity is approved for 3.25 contact hours.

Course Details

Course Code: REL-IDD-GH-SI
Hours: 3.25
Type: Online Course
Content Expiration Date: 12/31/2023
Learning Objectives:
Explain why direct support staff need to be proficient in teaching skills and routines through systematic instruction.
Describe how to approach a learning experience for an individual, including preparation and planning for instruction.
List and describe at least three instructional techniques to use if natural learning experiences are not enough for an individual to learn a task or skill.

Outline:
Section 1: Introduction A. About This Course B. Learning Objectives Section 2: Introduction to Systematic Instruction A. Karen’s Experience with Grocery Shopping B. What Went Wrong? C. Being an Effective Teacher D. Effective Teaching Strategies E. Systematic Instruction F. Assumptions Can Limit Opportunities G. Faulty Assumptions H. A Second Look at an “Easy” Job I. Teaching Strategies Simplify Complexity J. Identifying What to Teach K. Proactive Strategies at the Beginning L. Understanding the Learning Environment M. Pause to Reflect N. A Learning Plan O. Completing the Learning Plan P. Using the Learning Plan to Teach Routines Q. Using the Learning Plan to Describe Task Steps R. Using the Learning Plan to Describe Learning Styles S. Sofia’s Success T. Summary Section 3: How to Teach A. Support Staff’s Role in Teaching B. Goal of Systematic Instruction C. The Seven Phase Sequence D. The First Four Phases: Natural Ways E. Phase 1: Communicate Natural Ways F. Phase 2: Promote Natural Means G. Phase 3: Utilize Natural People H. Phase 4: Facilitate Successful Performance I. Let’s Review J. Phases 5-7: The Back-Up Ways to Train and Support K. Phase 5: Support, Assist, and Substitute for Natural People L. Phase 6: Reconsider Natural Means M. Phase 7: Adapt, Modify, or Change Natural Ways N. Task Modification Strategies: Les and Lawn Mowing O. Using the Seven Phase Sequence P. Advice to Mary Q. Summary Section 4: Systematic Instruction Strategies When the Natural Ways Aren’t Enough A. Teachable Steps B. Individualize the Teachable Steps C. Try It! D. How Does Effective Learning Occur? E. Errorless Learning F. Errorless Learning Techniques G. Error-Free Learning H. When to Apply Errorless Learning Techniques I. Time Delay J. Time Delay Strategies K. Allowing More Time L. When Should I Wait It Out? M. Prompting N. Prompting Hierarchy O. Least-to-Most Prompting Hierarchy P. Using the Prompting Hierarchy Q. Important Considerations Regarding Prompting R. Cautions about Over-Prompting S. Fading Prompts T. Instructional Assists U. What Are Instructional Assists? V. Let’s Review W. Systematic Instruction: Steps to Teaching X. Reinforcement Y. Misconceptions about Reinforcement Z. Identifying Reinforcers AA. Food for Thought BB. Motivation vs. Skills Acquisition CC. Natural Reinforcers DD. Increasing the Reinforcement Schedule EE. Options for Increasing the Reinforcement Schedule FF. No News Is Good News GG. Fading Reinforcers HH. Lola’s Motivation II. Summary Section 5: Put Into Practice A. Wrap-Up B. Using What You Learned C. Creating Your Own Work Portfolio Section 6: Conclusion A. Summary B. Course Contributors C. Resources D. References E. Congratulations! F. Exam

Staff Writer: Vickie Vining, BA
Vicki Vining is currently an independent consultant providing consultation, training, and coaching with people and organizations who are interested in making their services more values-based and meaningful for the people who use them. Ms. Vining has over 40 years of experience in human services, teaching in the public school system, supervising a crisis team in a state developmental center, working as a behavior consultant, managing a community employment and activity program for adults with autism, and supervising resource development and quality assurance in a California regional center. She is now a private consultant, assisting individuals and organizations across the country with self-determination, supported living, personalized day and employment services, and other person-centered services. She works with private and governmental agencies to shift their services toward supporting regular lives for people with disabilities. She provides training and coaching in person-centered thinking, tools and processes for implementing person-centered services, and other topics that support programs and systems to assist people with disabilities to develop and pursue their own plans for their lives like other people in society. Disclosure: Vickie Vining, BA has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
Expert Reviewer: Beth Keeton, MS
Ms. Keeton has worked closely with the state of Florida’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) to coordinate the development and implementation of a Self-Employment Certification curriculum. Florida VR has been the first in the nation to make such an extensive commitment to supporting self-employment as a possible outcome for all customers. Beth has served as the point-person for this effort and has been actively involved in all aspects of implementation including: developing the training curriculum; training VR vendors; and providing ongoing technical assistance to VR staff (both state and local), vendors, and customers. Additionally, Beth works with GHA on several other national projects, all of which are geared towards increasing the quantity and quality of employment outcomes through Customized Employment. For the last decade, Beth has provided extensive training and technical assistance throughout the country on positive behavior support, self-employment, customized employment, and benefits analysis. During her time on the various self-employment projects, she has developed expertise in all aspects of business plan development and has discovered a particular affinity for financial planning and Social Security benefits analysis. Disclosure: Beth Keeton, MS has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
Expert Reviewer: Cary Griffin, MA
Cary Griffin is a Senior Partner at Griffin-Hammis Associates, a full service consultancy which specializes in building communities of economic cooperation, creating high performance organizations, and focuses on disability and employment. Cary maintains a strong relationship with the Rural Institute at The University of Montana, where he served as Director of Adult Community Services & Supports. He is the former Executive Director of the Center for Technical Assistance & Training (CTAT) in Denver. Cary provides training to administrative and direct service level professionals in the rehabilitation field; consultation to businesses and rehabilitation agencies regarding the employment of individuals with significant disabilities; conducts field-initiated research & demonstration; provides family & consumer case consultation; develops resources; and organizational development. Recently, Cary has been instrumental in designing self-employment protocols and training for individuals, agencies, and states. Disclosure: Cary Griffin, MA has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
Expert Reviewer: David Hammis
David Hammis is Senior Partner at Griffin-Hammis Associates, a full service consultancy which specializes in building communities of economic cooperation, creating high performance organizations, and focuses on disability and employment. David maintains an ongoing relationship with the Rural Institute at The University of Montana, where he served as Project Director for four employment and Social Security outreach training and technical assistance projects, and now serves as an Organizational Consultant for the Rural Institutes Rural Entrepreneurship and Self-Employment Expansion Design Project. Dave works with organizations nationally and internationally on benefits analysis, supported employment, supported entrepreneurial employment, and employment engineering. Disclosure: David Hammis has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
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Asynchronous/Online Distance Learning; please see certificate details for specifics on delivery format.
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