Implementing Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Adults

 

This course is designed to help educate the speech language pathologist on best practices and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions for adults with complex communication disorders and acquired disabilities. An overview of AAC systems and strategies will be discussed as well as frequently used terminology within the field of AAC. You will explore some of the most common diagnoses encountered with speech generating device (SGD) implications. The content in this webinar will also highlight key assessment considerations as well as models of intervention for several commonly acquired speech disorders (e.g., ALS, MS, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, and Brainstem Stroke, etc.). It will help guide you to achieve positive outcome goals by giving you the tools necessary to identify the best techniques for managing and sustaining effective communication.

$30.00

Hours: 1.50
REL-RT-0-IAACA

Certificates

Certificates provided by accrediting body (2 Match)

Kansas Health Department of Aging and Disability Services (Speech)

1.5 HOURS


Approved for 1.50 continuing education clock hours for Kansas Speech Pathologists and Audiologists by the Kansas Department of Aging and Disability. Long Term Sponsorship number LTS-S1057. This activity is approved for 1.50 contact hours.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

1.5 HOURS



This course is offered for 0.15 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate level; Professional Area).

Course Details

Course Code: REL-RT-0-IAACA
Hours: 1.5
Type: Online Course
Content Expiration Date: 10/31/2020
Learning Objectives:
• Examine the differences between rehabilitative services and AAC services for adults with acquired disabilities.
• Define the 2 factors in AAC implementation that result in a feeling of communicative competence and contribute to the strongest desire to communicate in AAC users.
• Identify at least 3 medical diagnoses that result in communication deficits that can be addressed by augmentative and alternative communication.
• Explore models for AAC intervention that provide an implementation framework for 5 acquired diagnoses.
• Describe at least 5 necessary components of the AAC evaluation process that one must consider when working with adults with acquired disabilities.

Outline:
Learning Objectives Course Description ASHA Requirements for Speakers Thoughts on AAC & Acquired Disabilities Knowledge Check ASHA Position The Challenge Evidence Based Practice & AAC Evidence Based Practice (EBP): Knowledge About the Client EBP: Knowledge about Best Practices EBP: Knowledges about Devices Impact of Acquired Disability Influence of Motivation on AAC Use Common Diagnoses SGD Implications Knowledge Check AAC Overview: Abbreviations, Systems, and Terminology AAC Modalities: Communication Includes AAC Evaluation for Adult Acquired Disabilities AAC Evaluation Components for Adult Acquired Disabilities Models for AAC Intervention: Phases Models for AAC Intervention: Phases Phases in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Management Early Phase ALS Management Middle Phase ALS Management Late Phase ALS Management Phases in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Management Early Phase MS Management Middle Phase MS Management Late Phase MS Management Phases in Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) Management Early Phase Guillain-Barre Syndrome Management Middle Phase Guillain-Barre Syndrome Management Late Phase Guillain-Barre Syndrome Management Phases in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) Management Early Phase in Parkinson’s Disease Management Middle Phase in Parkinson’s Disease Management Late Phase in Parkinson’s Disease Management Phases in Brainstem Stroke Management Early Phase in Brainstem Stroke Management Middle Phase in Brainstem Stroke Management Late Phase in Brainstem Stroke Management Knowledge Check Models for AAC Intervention to Restore Natural Speech: Staging Locked-in Syndrome AAC Management for Severe Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech AAC Management for Severe Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech Challenges Challenges in Aphasia and AAC: Types of Communicators Partner-Dependent: Emerging AAC Communicators Partner-Dependent: Contextual Choice AAC Communicators Partner-Dependent: Transitional AAC Communicators Independent: Stored-Message AAC Communicators Independent: Generative AAC Communicators Visual Scene Displays (VSC) & Aphasia Visual Scene Displays (VSC) & Aphasia “About Me” Visual Scene Displays (VSC) & Aphasia “Family Page” Knowledge Check AAC in Traumatic Brain Injury AAC in Traumatic Brain Injury: Natural Speech Strategies AAC in Traumatic Brain Injury: Approaches AAC in Traumatic Brain Injury: Early Stage (Levels I, II, & III) AAC in Traumatic Brain Injury: Middle Stage (Levels IV & V) AAC in Traumatic Brain Injury: Late Stage (Levels VI, VII, & VIII) AAC Intervention: Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) Staging AAC Intervention: Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) AAC Intervention: Dementia AAC Intervention: Stages of Dementia AAC Intervention: Dementia AAC Strategies for Individuals Following Surgery AAC Supports for Temporary Conditions Successful Implementation and Buy-In Tips for Education Staff, Families, and Caregivers on AAC Knowledge Check

Instructor: April B. Furr, MS, CCC-SLP
April Furr is a speech-language pathologist with 9 years of experience in the field of augmentative communication and assistive technology. Her work experience includes working with the North Carolina Assistive Technology Program, Wake County Public Schools (Assistive Technology Specialist), and in acute care settings. Her professional memberships include the American Speech-Language Hearing Association and ASHA SIG 12. Disclosure: April B. Furr, MS, CCC-SLP has declared that no conflict of interest, Relevant Financial Relationship or Relevant Non-Financial Relationship exists.
Instructor: Celeste Helling, MA, CCC-SLP, ATP
Celeste Helling is a speech-language pathologist with the North Carolina Assistive Technology Program in Charlotte, NC. She is also the developer of several iOS apps, including AAC Evaluation Genie. Her professional memberships include the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), ASHA SIG 12, North Carolina Augmentative Communication Association (NCACA), International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC). I also serve on the NCACA Long Range Planning Committee. Disclosure: Celeste Helling, MA, CCC-SLP, ATP discloses the following potential conflict of interests/commercial interests: Relevant Financial Relationship with Hump Software Tip Top Apps as Owner/App Developer Relevant Non-Financial Relationship with North Carolina Augmentative Communication Association as Member; Co-Chair of the NCACA Long Range Planning Committee.
Target Audience:
The target audience for this course is: intermediate level Speech and Language Pathologists; in the following settings: Rehabilitation Settings.
Relias will be transparent in disclosing if any commercial support, sponsorship or co-providership is present prior to the learner completing the course.
Course Delivery Method and Format
Asynchronous/Online Distance Learning; please see certificate details for specifics on delivery format.
Relias has a grievance policy in place to facilitate reports of dissatisfaction. Relias will make every effort to resolve each grievance in a mutually satisfactory manner. In order to report a complaint or grievance please contact Relias.
If you require special accommodations to complete this module, please contact Relias Support by completing the web form (https://www.relias.com/help) or by using the chat functionality.
All courses offered by Relias, LLC are developed from a foundation of diversity, inclusiveness, and a multicultural perspective. Knowledge, values and awareness related to cultural competency are infused throughout the course content.
Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, service mark, manufacturer or otherwise does not constitute or imply any endorsement, recommendation, or favoring of, or affiliation with, Relias, LLC.
All characteristics and organizations referenced in the following training are fictional. Any resemblance to any actual organizations or persons living or dead, is purely coincidental.
To earn continuing education credit for this course you must achieve a passing score of 80% on the post-test and complete the course evaluation.
Accommodations
If you require special accommodations to complete this module, please contact Relias Customer Support here.