Safe Eating for Canada

Green Clock Hours: 0.75

The dining process can be an enjoyable, creative, and social time of the day. For many, food is directly related to quality of life. Changes in health, mental status, and living arrangements can drastically change someone’s diet. Meals, including snacks, are the single most consistently accessible, manageable, and effective health promoting activity you can offer residents. Knowing how to make the experience desirable while keeping safety at the forefront is a priceless skill to have (Donovan, 2017). As a person ages, the need to maintain a healthy and nutritional diet becomes increasingly important. The aging process makes people more prone to illnesses, decreased appetite, a decreased sense of taste, and impaired swallowing abilities. Appetites of older adults are affected by loss of teeth, poor dentition or poor fitting dentures, vision impairments, hearing impairments, problems with perception, loss of cognition, onset of dementia, fatigue, and loss of control over the dining process in general (Sorrentino, Remmert, & Wilke, 2018). Finding the proper combinations of foods and fluids to promote wellness is not an easy task. The care team must work with the resident and the family to decide how to best balance proper nutrition with pleasurable dining. Residents are assessed to determine the best food and fluid choices for their individual health needs. As a caregiver, you are tasked with helping residents to eat well and obtain the nutrients they need to remain healthy. You should be knowledgeable of residents’ individual dietary needs and how to promote healthy and safe eating.

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$20.00

Course Description

The dining process can be an enjoyable, creative, and social time of the day. For many, food is directly related to quality of life. Changes in health, mental status, and living arrangements can drastically change someone’s diet. Meals, including snacks, are the single most consistently accessible, manageable, and effective health promoting activity you can offer residents. Knowing how to make the experience desirable while keeping safety at the forefront is a priceless skill to have (Donovan, 2017). As a person ages, the need to maintain a healthy and nutritional diet becomes increasingly important. The aging process makes people more prone to illnesses, decreased appetite, a decreased sense of taste, and impaired swallowing abilities. Appetites of older adults are affected by loss of teeth, poor dentition or poor fitting dentures, vision impairments, hearing impairments, problems with perception, loss of cognition, onset of dementia, fatigue, and loss of control over the dining process in general (Sorrentino, Remmert, & Wilke, 2018). Finding the proper combinations of foods and fluids to promote wellness is not an easy task. The care team must work with the resident and the family to decide how to best balance proper nutrition with pleasurable dining. Residents are assessed to determine the best food and fluid choices for their individual health needs. As a caregiver, you are tasked with helping residents to eat well and obtain the nutrients they need to remain healthy. You should be knowledgeable of residents’ individual dietary needs and how to promote healthy and safe eating.

Only $249
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Only $249