Pain Assessment for Canada

Green Clock Hours: 0.75

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI, 2016) reports that for the 2014-2015 period, 9.5% of long-term care residents experienced pain and 11% experienced worsened pain. While these numbers are steadily improving over recent years, pain remains an issue for residents. Without proper treatment for pain, residents experience little rest and comfort, and their quality of life significantly diminishes. As caregivers, our goal should be to provide residents comfort, facilitate their independence, and preserve their dignity. If residents are in pain, meeting this goal becomes increasingly more challenging, if not impossible. Comprehensive pain assessments are key to successfully identifying and managing pain. A comprehensive pain assessment consists of gathering a history of residents’ pain, using pain scales to rate intensity, conducting physical exams to identify pain sites, and carefully observing residents’ for non-verbal signs of pain. Pain assessments can be challenging, especially for cognitively impaired residents, as they may be unable to tell you where their pain is located, or even that they hurt. As a result, they are less likely to have their pain identified and managed.

Read More

$24.95

Course Description

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI, 2016) reports that for the 2014-2015 period, 9.5% of long-term care residents experienced pain and 11% experienced worsened pain. While these numbers are steadily improving over recent years, pain remains an issue for residents. Without proper treatment for pain, residents experience little rest and comfort, and their quality of life significantly diminishes. As caregivers, our goal should be to provide residents comfort, facilitate their independence, and preserve their dignity. If residents are in pain, meeting this goal becomes increasingly more challenging, if not impossible. Comprehensive pain assessments are key to successfully identifying and managing pain. A comprehensive pain assessment consists of gathering a history of residents’ pain, using pain scales to rate intensity, conducting physical exams to identify pain sites, and carefully observing residents’ for non-verbal signs of pain. Pain assessments can be challenging, especially for cognitively impaired residents, as they may be unable to tell you where their pain is located, or even that they hurt. As a result, they are less likely to have their pain identified and managed.

Only $249
Want Unlimited Access?
The Academy All Access Subscription provides 1-click enrollment into 1,450+ courses for one low price.
Only $249