Recording Law Enforcement Actions 1.0

Green Clock Hours: 1.00

Since 1969, law enforcement officers have been guided in searches incidental to arrest by Chimel v. California. In that case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if police arrest an individual, they may - without a search warrant - search the body of the person and … the area into which he might reach, perhaps to destroy evidence or to seize a weapon. In the years since, society has changed, as has technology. With the proliferation of handheld electronic devices, such as Smart Phones, PDA's, Tablets, and the like, law enforcement officers are changing their approach to the information explosion caused by these emerging technologies. This course focuses on some of these emerging technologies and officer procedural changes brought about by the technology, as well as legal ramifications. We also explore concerns for individual private property rights, and the recent landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Riley v. California, that protects a resident's right to privacy when an electronic device is seized by law enforcement or incidental to arrest.

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$19.95

Course Description

Since 1969, law enforcement officers have been guided in searches incidental to arrest by Chimel v. California. In that case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if police arrest an individual, they may - without a search warrant - search the body of the person and … the area into which he might reach, perhaps to destroy evidence or to seize a weapon. In the years since, society has changed, as has technology. With the proliferation of handheld electronic devices, such as Smart Phones, PDA's, Tablets, and the like, law enforcement officers are changing their approach to the information explosion caused by these emerging technologies. This course focuses on some of these emerging technologies and officer procedural changes brought about by the technology, as well as legal ramifications. We also explore concerns for individual private property rights, and the recent landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Riley v. California, that protects a resident's right to privacy when an electronic device is seized by law enforcement or incidental to arrest.

Only $249
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Only $249