Preventing Unnecessary Hospital Admissions and Readmissions

Green Clock Hours: 0.50

Ms. Baldwin is crying out for help. She is confused and disoriented. She returned from the hospital this morning after “bouncing back” to the hospital following a successful hip replacement surgery. Two hospitalizations in a month have left the normally alert and oriented Ms. Baldwin in a debilitated state. “It’s a shame about that second hospitalization,” one caregiver says, “She was doing so well after her first discharge.” What happened to Ms. Baldwin? Bounce back, frequent flyer, rehospitalization, readmission – regardless of the term used, the revolving door of admission and readmission to the hospital can have a negative effect on an individual’s quality of life. They are associated with the development of delirium, depression, functional decline, and healthcare-associated complications, such as infections and pressure ulcers. On top of this, unnecessary hospital admissions and readmissions are costly for Medicare and other payers. As a caregiver, you are likely the person who spends the most time with those you care for, and therefore, are in a unique position to help prevent unnecessary hospital admissions and readmissions. In this course, you will learn about the problem with unnecessary hospital admissions as well as ways that you can prevent them. Note: The purpose of this course is to discuss avoidable hospital admissions and readmissions. Sometimes an individual’s condition truly warrants hospitalization. The overall goal of caregivers is to ensure that an individual receives the appropriate level of care given their current condition. In other words, the right kind of care provided in the right place at the right time.

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$25.00

Course Description

Ms. Baldwin is crying out for help. She is confused and disoriented. She returned from the hospital this morning after “bouncing back” to the hospital following a successful hip replacement surgery. Two hospitalizations in a month have left the normally alert and oriented Ms. Baldwin in a debilitated state. “It’s a shame about that second hospitalization,” one caregiver says, “She was doing so well after her first discharge.” What happened to Ms. Baldwin? Bounce back, frequent flyer, rehospitalization, readmission – regardless of the term used, the revolving door of admission and readmission to the hospital can have a negative effect on an individual’s quality of life. They are associated with the development of delirium, depression, functional decline, and healthcare-associated complications, such as infections and pressure ulcers. On top of this, unnecessary hospital admissions and readmissions are costly for Medicare and other payers. As a caregiver, you are likely the person who spends the most time with those you care for, and therefore, are in a unique position to help prevent unnecessary hospital admissions and readmissions. In this course, you will learn about the problem with unnecessary hospital admissions as well as ways that you can prevent them. Note: The purpose of this course is to discuss avoidable hospital admissions and readmissions. Sometimes an individual’s condition truly warrants hospitalization. The overall goal of caregivers is to ensure that an individual receives the appropriate level of care given their current condition. In other words, the right kind of care provided in the right place at the right time.

Only $249
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Only $249